Monday, January 28, 2019

Mishap Class has Modern, Sci-Fi Use


My Google search for random encounter material turned up this gem


BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE
AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 91-204
27 APRIL 2018
Safety


It is 104 pages of mind numbing bureaucrat speak which can easily be ported into the mouths of your science fiction NPCs. 

Code definitions in a statute(?) can be useful when defining random table elements I pulled these out of the document and I think these five class distinctions can be real useful for any Game Master of a Modern or Science Fiction RPG. Not the least is "pegging" the dollar-damage amount to a Class value. Now you have a built-in scale you can extrapolate results for whatever game system you may be using.

Class A Mishap—A mishap resulting in one or more of the following:
1.Direct mishap cost totaling $2,000,000 or more.
2.A fatality or permanent total disability.
3.Destruction of a DoD aircraft.
4.Permanent loss of primary mission capability of an AF space vehicle.

Class B Mishap—A mishap resulting in one or more of the following:
1.Direct mishap cost totaling $500,000 or more but less than $2,000,000.
2.A permanent partial disability.
3.Inpatient hospitalization of three or more personnel. This does not include individuals hospitalized for observation, diagnostic, or administrative purposes that were treated and released.
4.Permanent degradation of primary or secondary mission capability of a space vehicle or the permanent loss of secondary mission capability of a space vehicle.

Class C Mishap—A mishap resulting in one or more of the following:
1.Direct mishap cost totaling $50,000 or more but less than $500,000.
2.Any injury or occupational illness that causes loss of one or more days away from work not including the day or shift it occurred. When determining if the mishap is a Lost Time Case, you must count the number of days the employee was unable to work as a result of the injury or illness, regardless of whether the person was scheduled to work on those days. Weekend days, holidays, vacation days, or other days off are included in the total number of days, if the employee would not have been able to work on those days.
3.An occupational injury or illness resulting in permanent change of job.
4.Permanent loss or degradation of tertiary mission capability of a space vehicle.

Class D Mishap—An on-duty mishap resulting in one or more of the following:
1.Direct mishap cost totaling $20,000 or more but less than $50,000.
2.A recordable injury cost or illness not otherwise classified as a Class A, B, or C mishap.
3.Any work-related mishap resulting in a recordable injury or illness not otherwise classified as a Class A, B, or C mishap. These are cases where, because of injury or occupational illness, the employee only works partial days, has restricted duties (does not include medical restriction from flying or special operational duties by AF Form 2992) or was transferred to another job, required medical treatment greater than first aid, or experienced loss of consciousness (does not include G-loss of consciousness). In addition, a significant injury (e.g. fractured/cracked bone, punctured eardrum, any laser eye injury) or occupational illness (e.g. occupational cancer (mesothelioma), chronic irreversible disease (beryllium disease)) diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional must be reported even if it does not result in death, days away from work, restricted work, job transfer, medical treatment greater than first aid, or loss of consciousness.

Class E Mishap—A work-related mishap that falls below Class D criteria. Most Class E mishap reporting is voluntary; however see discipline-specific safety manuals for a list of events requiring mandatory reporting.

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